In the sillage of fragrances: recycling and energy | Hermès

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In the sillage of fragrances:
recycling and energy

From Eau d’Hermès, the original fragrance inspired by “the interior of a Hermès bag in which lingers the aroma of a fragrance” to the latest creation, Twilly d’Hermès, all of the house’s scents have been made in Vaudreuil in northern France. The manufacture is home to an olfactory library and closely monitors its environmental footprint.
A fragrance is like a state secret. Apart from the “nose” at Hermès, nobody knows its complete formula. Production is barely less mysterious. Dozens of raw materials for perfumery converge at the Vaudreuil site. Blends and transfers from one vat to another, follow on from one another, interspersed with pauses for maceration. Finally the formula is chilled to 0°C before filtering.
Once bottled, with the pump in place and the cap closed, the fragrance will travel in a leather sheath in the case of Hermessence, or be girdled in a stirrup for Galop d’Hermès. Nestling in its box, it is at last ready for its task of seduction.
What goes on behind the scenes is just as important. As soon as it is developed, a new fragrance is examined and laid bare in order to plan how the waste it leaves in its wake should be processed. Amongst the partners of Hermès Parfums who collect the 800 tonnes of residue each year from Vaudreuil, Cèdre is the company that goes the furthest in seeking recycling solutions. This concerns the recipients that contained the raw materials, as well as filters, plastics, damaged boxes and broken glass. 67% of materials are recycled. The rest is incinerated to produce energy.


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