Harnais de Cour scarf 90 - flat
Harnais de Cour scarf 90 - worn
The Perfect Partner
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      The story behind

      Two horses have trotted off leaving their harnesses behind... Outstanding craftsmen put all their skills into making these ceremonial harnesses regularly used in France until the mid-19th century but afterwards reserved for sovereigns and galas. In the days when French was the language of the court in many European countries, harnesses of the court were referred to as “à la française”. How could it be otherwise? Manes plaited with silk or trimmed with velvet ribbons decorated with tassels and embroidery called palatine, metal or braid rosettes, gleaming blinkers, leather hand-sewn by master saddlers… It is easy to imagine how fine they looked in their caparisons, led by men who watched over their gait and their passengers – grooms, postilions and other helpers. Decked in cloth, metal and leather, every step echoed with the lively clap of horseshoes on the ground and the tinkling of buckles engraved with the family’s arms. By two, six or eight, great attention was paid to the horses’ appearance for every one of these outings!